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Monsters, Inc. (2001)

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Monsters, Inc. (2001) (Movie)
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Monsters, Inc. (Movie)

November 2, 2001
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Monsters, Inc. is a 2001 computer animated comedy film and the fourth feature-length film produced by Pixar Animation Studios. The film was released to theaters by Walt Disney Pictures in the United States on November 2, 2001. 
Monstropolis is a modern retro city set in a monster-inhabited world, and Monsters, Inc., is the city's power company. Monsters, Inc. sends its employees to human children's bedrooms to scare the children, through teleportation doors set up on the work floor. The screams of children generate electric power for the city. However, the monsters believe that children themselves are toxic, and go to great lengths to prevent contact; should a monster be touched by a child or their belongings, the Child Detection Agency (CDA) is alerted to sanitize the affected being. With increasing numbers of children becoming desensitized by mass media, Monsters, Inc. CEO Henry J. Waternoose is finding it difficult to scare the children enough to meet the power demands of the city. 
One night, James P. Sullivan ("Sulley"), Monsters, Inc.'s top scarer, finds a door on the work floor after hours - in violation of policy. Peering inside, the child's room appears empty, but Sulley finds that a human girl has followed him through the door, thinking him to be a giant kitty. Terrified of contamination, he tries to return her, but is forced to hide when Randall Boggs, a competitive co-worker, come out of her door and returns it to the company's door vault. Sulley quickly hides the child and gets hold of Mike Wazowski, his co-worker and best friend, to figure out the situation. Together at Sulley's home, they discover that being touched by the child is not harmful at all, and that when she laughs, surrounding electrical power surges to incredible levels. Sulley nicknames the child "Boo" and becomes her caretaker until they can get her back home.