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Samsung Commercial for Samsung Galaxy Note (2012)

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Samsung Commercial for Samsung Galaxy Note

Winter/Spring 2012
Genres: Electronics
 
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  • Download on iTunes Buy on Amazon.com - Get the Song: Alone In Kyoto by Air
  • Download on iTunes Buy on Amazon.com - Get the Book: Martian Summer: Robot Arms, Cowboy Spacemen, and My 90 Days with the Phoenix Mars Mission written by Andrew Kessler
  • Download on iTunes Buy on Amazon.com - Get the App: Samsung Galaxy Note

Plot / Description

"Meet the Note" 
This commercial shows off the features and beauty of the new Samsung Galaxy Note. The first thing you notice is the giant screen - it is basically sized between your average smartphone and a tablet. A person is shown scrolling through many apps that are running at the same time by sliding their finger across the bottom of the screen. Next we see a person scrolling through their contacts and then browsing the web on the large screen. They watch full HD videos on the device, and then manipulate a map. 
 
Next we see that it has a stylus (pen) that can be used with it that is touted to "have a brain". We see someone making notes and highlighting sections of a scanned document as if it were a piece of paper and a highlighter. They then use the pen to edit a graph, and then to write on a picture (like a postcard) before sending texting it to someone. They use real handwriting to fill in and check off a to-do list, and later draw around a picture of a stroller to copy and paste it somewhere else. Other people are shown using the pen to draw and color a picture of a goldfish

Written Text

Introducing the Samsung Galaxy Note 
It's the best of a smartphone, and the best of a tablet. 
The screen is beautiful. 
It has a pen with a brain, built for big ideas. 
A pen so smart it has its own apps, to make something no one else can. 
Because life needs more than texts, smiley-faces and XOXO's. 
Introducing the Samsung Galaxy Note. 
Phone? Tablet? It's the best of both. 
Available at AT&T and Best Buy 
Samsung - Experience the Note at facebook.com/SamsungMobileUSA 
 
"Alone in Kyoto" - AIR 
Wacker and Columbus, Chicago IL 
That's me! Wish U were here!!! 
Bugaboo Bee - Need One 
We miss you daddy! 
To: Dad, Subject: We miss you!, yourgirls.jpg, We sent to the museum. Miss u... Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Note, and AT&T LTE smartphone 
 
 
Chapter One 
First-Day Jitters 
SOL 11 
It's near quitting time after a long day of taking photos of new acquaintances — Lory and Mad Hatter — measuring atmospheric gases, and digging. The Phoenix Mars lander beeps and blips along. The sun never sets on these long Martian summer nights, but the Phoenix has strict orders to rest. The engineers want Phoenix asleep before 5:00 p.m., Mars time. Soon it will be time to put away its instruments and recharge its batteries. With the core plan nearly finished, Peter Smith and the engineers back home will be pleased. 
 
There's just one more critical task before Phoenix can crank up its night-time heaters and initiate sleep. 
 
"RA Acquire Sample with Rac Doc" and initiate sleep. 
 
"RA Acquire Sample with Rac Doc" is the instruction. This note and the corresponding lander code tells Phoenix to scrape up the first ever scoopful of Martian dirt. It's no ordinary scoop of Martian dirt. This scoop is a milestone in a long journey-one that took centuries to complete. It's the first human experiment ever done on the arctic plains of Mars. And a tiny step in the process of one day getting a man to Mars. A small camera mounted on the robot arm documents the moment for posterity. 
 
Once this Martian dirt is safely tucked away, Phoenix will send home its daily report and then head off to bed-to dream of finding little green men and having its day delivering a lecture to the king of Norway when it accepts its Nobel Prize on a stage in Oslo. I know it's just a robot, but did I mention it's not coming back alive? Phoenix is a robot suicide mission. 
 
Back on Earth, I imagine what it might be like on Mars as I swipe my security badge for the first time and walk into Mission Control.